Damon Dunn and his wife Danielle operate Dunn Right Towing and Recovery in the Comox Valley. They often find themselves working in dangerous and vulnerable situations on area highways.

“I’ve been almost hit,” said Damon Dunn. “We were doing a recovery on the highway once and had a truck cross right over into the shoulder lane and almost hit us.”

Operating a tow truck is considered one of the most dangerous jobs in North America. The Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) says more than 100 tow-truck drivers die on the job every year in North America. Six have died already this month. It’s something that’s always on the minds of the Dunn’s.

“Of course we’re worried about our lives, people are going 120 plus on this highway, just not paying attention,” added Damon. “There’s no slowing down and moving over, people are ripping by at 110 even though they’re supposed to be going 70 at this point.”

The Slow Down, Move Over law in B.C. states: motorists are required to slow down and move over for all vehicles stopped alongside the road that have flashing red, blue or yellow lights. This includes maintenance workers, utility workers, police, fire, ambulance, tow trucks, Commercial Vehicle Safety Enforcement personnel, land surveyors, animal control workers, garbage collectors and other roadside workers.

Motorists must slow their speed to:

  • 70km/h when in an 80km/h or over zone
  • 40km/h when in an under 80km/h zone

But Damon and Danielle said drivers rarely slow down.

“I know some people think it’s just a tow truck but that’s our family and we’ve got kids to go home to so if you see yellow lights just slow down,” said Danielle.

“Scares the heck out of me, to be honest, I’ve got five kids at home and I really need to get home to them at night,” said Damon.

Drivers caught not slowing down and moving over face a fine of $173 and three penalty points.

Dean Stoltz