A retired man living in Metchosin is scratching his head, after learning he has to pay more to insure his pickup truck — even though he is an outstanding driver.

ICBC has given Kevin MacLean a driver factor of o.407, the best possible score. This means he has been driving for over 40 years with no at-fault incidents.

“To me [the program change] seems very understandable…. [but] to renew my insurance I have a 25 per cent increase… how does that make sense?” said MacLean.

“It was just a feeling of this is not what I expected, and I just wanted some clarification, why is this happening?.”

He was confused after hearing that drivers like him would save money under the new program.

Last year, his basic premium was $477 for his truck. This year it rose by 5.7 per cent to $504. Small to some, but the big jump was with his optional liability insurance — up 21.7 per cent, from $161 to $196.

He is the only driver for the vehicle.

“I was given some reasoning, not that it made a lot of sense to me, one was actually there has been a rate increase overall for everybody, and that explains why your premiums are going up, again it was contrary to what was presented,” said MacLean.

The public insurer also temporary raised his driver rating, so they could break even over the next few years with the new program.

There are also other reasons costs could be going up, including where you live.

“Southern Vancouver Island again similar to the Mainland, population has increased and the amount of crashes has also increased, so that is part of the calculation when premiums are up,” said Tyler Mcgilvery of ICBC said on Tuesday.

Brokers also say that the entire system has changed. The price spike in his liability coverage may have to do with his truck size and type.

They also said going to a private insurer for the liability would likely not save him much.

But ICBC maintains that there are savings for most.

“More than half have saved since they renewed, meaning they paid less this year then they paid last year,” said Mcgilvery.

MacLean went public after he felt ICBC was not being honest, and says even though he can manage with the change, others may not.

“It puts more pressure on the elderly people… it was presented good drivers would be paying less… and such is not occurring,” he added.

He hopes his story could make ICBC review the changes.

MacLean will also be applying for the low-kilometre discount, which could get his rates down.

ICBC was not available by phone to speak to CHEK News Saturday.

Julian Kolsut