The father of one of the suspected murders from Port Alberni is fighting to get a “‘last will and testament” video released to him by the RCMP.

In a document obtained by CHEK News, RCMP confirmed in an email to Al Schmegelsky’s legal counsel that a video exists which “has to do with how Bryer wanted his body dealt with after the death.”

Police went on to say “that information was passed on to his mother, the next of kin, who is dealing with this as the body has been released to her,” and that “the RCMP has not publicly discussed the video or acknowledged it, though [they] plan to do so in a media release in the next couple of weeks.”

Sarah Leamon, Al Schmegelsky’s legal council, says he has a right to see his son’s video.

“My client is the biological father of Bryer so of course he does wish to view the video and see it before the public does” Leamon says. “As his father, he has the right to access this last will and testament. He is looking for closure, like any father would.”

“It was playing out in front of the entire country and the entire world and he wants to take that private moment to grieve his son.”

Leamon says the video is a last will and testament. She is not ruling out taking legal action against the RCMP.

“We are going to take whatever steps are appropriate in these circumstances, we have to explore our options,” says Leamon.

“At the end of the day, its about his parental rights… it’s about the emotional closure and dramatic and harrowing experience he has gone through.”

The letter goes on to show the RCMP saying they would appreciate the information to be kept private.

Schmegelsky told CHEK News Saturday that “I just want to lay flowers on my kids grave… I wasn’t invited to his funeral. I don’t even know where he is. Just another stab in my heart by authorities.”

Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, have been charged with second-degree murder in the death of Leonard Dyck, 64, whose body was found July 19 near the pair’s burned-out truck in northwestern B.C.

They are also suspects in the death of Australian Lucas Fowler and his American girlfriend Chynna Deese, found four days earlier along a highway more than 450 kilometres from where Dyck’s body was discovered.

The two fled B.C. and were spotted heading east, before the Rav-4 they were driving was found burned out near Gillam, MB on Jully 22. The RCMP launched a massive search in the remote community and dense wilderness in the area.

They were eventually found dead, just eight kilometres from the burned out car on August 7.

An autopsy revealed they died from from suicides by gunfire. The two were also deceased for a number of days before they were found. Officials added that there were strong indications that they had been alive for a few days since they were last seen.

Two firearms were also located with the suspects, and forensic analysis is underway to confirm the weapons were connected with the northern B.C. homicide investigations.

Julian Kolsut and April Lawrence