“Ya it’s an old truck, but it’s done well by me,” said Willi Boepple, pointing to her classic black Ford Ranger.

The vehicle is Boepple’s last shred of freedom.

“It’s my independence, I can see my doctor, I can go to appointments,” said Boepple.

“It’s my last little link to any kind of hope at all.”

The 60-year-old prize-winning dairy goat farmer found herself homeless last year.

“I lost my lease, and I couldn’t find another place where I could keep my livestock and farm,” said Boepple through tears.

“I lost my herd at the same time I’ve become homeless. It’s been a nightmare.”

For a year now, Willi has bumped from shelter to shelter, parking her truck where she can. But with osteoarthritis and lung disease, she’s missed many moments to move her car.

Now, she’s facing the wrath of city parking patrollers.

“I have all these unpaid tickets, it’s probably around $800 now,” said Boepple.

She can’t afford to pay the tickets and is now on the city’s tow list. Her last possession could be lost at any moment, something advocates say could put an end to any chance she has at a future.

“Cars are recognized as one of the most important things you can give someone who is low income, to increase their possibilities of finding work,” said Doug King.

But the city is listening.

“The extra stress of those parking tickets are probably not helping her too much. So for her, or anyone else that are having these challenges, our staff are pretty reasonable so I would say to her, come to city hall and have a conversation,” said Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps.

And while grateful for the gesture, Willi says the change she’s seeking is much bigger than just herself.

“I would like for them to create two or three designated parking spots at each shelter, so the few homeless people that do have cars, don’t have to give up the last thing that we have,” said Boepple.

 

Kori Sidaway