If you’re a pickle person prepare to pay more — a considerable number of grocery items made in the United States will be hit with Canada’s 10 per cent retaliatory tariffs as of July 1.

“It’s not 10 per cent on everything, it’s 10 per cent on a few things that are in their shopping basket so it might impact them a dollar or two per trip to the store,” said UVic Marketing Professor Brock Smith.

The surtax will apply to a lengthy list of more than 120 consumer goods imported from the United States including chocolate, whiskey, toilet paper, lawnmowers, mattresses and sleeping bags.

“I think it was the intent of these strategic tariffs was to get the attention of some of the senators in the U.S. that belong to those states that are targeted but it also gives an opportunity for local producers and perhaps make some inroads in our local market,” said Smith.

But for some items on the list like appliances, there are few, if any, Canadian alternatives. Washing machines, dishwashers, and fridges are made in the U.S. and will be subject to the tariffs.

Local retailers say it will be a few months until you might see local prices impacted.

“If you have a project coming up and you’re going to need appliances regardless, your chances are going to be better to do sooner than later,” said Eric Barney, a sales representative at Lansdowne Appliance in Victoria.

The good news is for Canadian producers. Country Grocer says sales of Vancouver Island products has jumped in the past month as people look to buy local.

“You just people being conscious of where it’s coming from where before it was just price conscious,” said assistant sales manager Garth Green.

And with the tariffs on some U.S. products coming into effect July 1, the price on local goods may soon be more attractive than ever.

April Lawrence